New Open Source Hardware KiCAD project board in stock: MOD-OLED-128×64

MOD-OLED-128x64-3

MOD-OLED-128×64 is low cost, low power, high contrast LCD display with UEXT connector which allow to be used with any of our OLinuXino and Arduino boards.

The LCD panel control is done via I2C thus only 4 wires are necessary Vcc 3.3V, GND, SCL and SDA.

The power supply required is only 1 uA in sleep mode, 200 uA in operating mode and 7mA in display ON mode.

View area is 21 x 11 mm.

MOD-OLED-128×64 can be used on Breadboard too. For this purpose 4 pin header is provided which could be soldered on the back of the board.

MOD-OLED-128x64-2

 

 

KiCAD files are on GitHub, Python code to work with any of our OLinuXino Linux board is provided, also code for Arduino.

New KiCAD OSHW PCB project – Breakboard for ADS1220 Low Power 24-bit ADC

BB-ADS1220-1

ADS1220 is four channel 24-bit precise Sigma-Delta ADC with these features:

  • Low Current Consumption 120 µA in Duty-Cycle Mode
  • Wide Supply Range: 2.3 V to 5.5 V
  • Programmable Gain: 1 V/V to 128 V/V
  • Programmable Data Rates: Up to 2 kSPS
  • Up to 20-Bits Effective Resolution
  • Simultaneous 50-Hz and 60-Hz Rejection at 20 SPS with Single-Cycle Settling Digital Filter
  • Two Differential or Four Single-Ended Inputs
  • Dual Matched Programmable Current Sources: 10 µA to 1.5 mA
  • Internal 2.048-V Reference: 5 ppm/°C (typ) Drift
  • Internal 2% Accurate Oscillator
  • Internal Temperature Sensor: 0.5°C (typ) Accuracy
  • SPI-Compatible Interface (Mode 1)

The PCB is made with KiCAD and files are uploaded on GitHub with Apache 2.0 Licensee.

Software examples how to use BB-ADS1220 with OLIMEXINO-32U4 (Arduino Leonardo) and A20-OLinuXino-MICRO are available as reference.

MOD-LCD3310 OSHW monochrome LCD 84×48 pixels board with UEXT connector

MOD-LCD3310

MOD-LCD3310 is Open Source Hardware board released under Apache 2.0 Licensee.
It’s low cost 84×48 pixels LCD which can connect to any of our development boards with UEXT connectors.
The schematic in PDF format and Board and Schematic files in Eagle CAD format are on GitHub.

Examples how to connect MOD-LCD3310 to OLIMEXINO-32U4 (Arduino Leonardo), OLIMEXINO-STM32 (Maple), PIC32-PINGUINO (Pinguino), A20-OLinuXino-MICRO, LPC-P1227 (NXP) and STM32-P103 (ST) are on GitHub.

The LCD panel alone is also available for purchase on our web shop

LCD3310-1

backlight panel

NOKIA3310-BACKLIGHT-2

and the matching connector

LCD3310-CON

which you can use to make your own PCBs with this display for your next project.

Experimenting with Gas Sensors and Arduino

Sensors

We have 4 different Gas Sensors on our web shop: MQ-2, MQ-3, MQ-7 and MQ-135.

All they work on same principle: sensor element is heated and it’s conductivity change with the gas concentration.

The heater require 5V and have 31 ohm resistance, so your power supply should provide 200mA of current for the sensor.

Sensor have both analog and digital output, the analog output is 0-5V, the digital output is frequency related to the output value.

MQ-2 is sensor of LPG, Propane, Methane and Hydrogen gas and can be used for domestic gas leak alarms
MQ-3 is sensor of Alcohol and Benzine and can be used for breath analizer
MQ-7 is sensor of Carbon monoxide CO and can be used for car gases analizer
MQ-135 is sensor of NH3, NOx, Alcohol, Benzine, Smoke, CO2 and can be used for quality of air analizer

We did some experiments today with all four sensors connecting them to OLIMEXINO-32U4 (Arduino Leonardo compatible).

The sensors have 4 pins: AO – Analog Output, DO – Digital output, GND, VCC-5V

MQ-1 MQ-2

OLIMEXINO-32U4 should be switched to work on 5V.

Three wires are used: AO from sensor to A0 of Arduino, VCC from sensor to 5V, GND from sensor to GND of Arduino.

The sketch is simple:

int sensorPin = A0;
int sensorValue = 0;
void setup() {
 Serial.begin(9600);
 pinMode(sensorPin, INPUT);
}
void loop() {
 sensorValue = analogRead(sensorPin);
 Serial.println(sensorValue);
}

It reads the sensor value and print it on Serial terminal.

Note that when sensor are power up they need about 1 minute to settle, in this time the heater heats up the sensor.

We experimented with Isopropile alcohol, Benzine, Lighter Gas, human breath of two different persons :)

Here is the measured data:

MQ-2 normal air output  100
     Isopropile alcohol 540
     Ligther Gas        760
     Benzine            450
     Breath1            150
     Breath2            140
MQ-3 normal air output 180
     Isopropile alcohol 800
     Lighter Gas        400
     Benzine            700
     Breath1            220
     Breath2            270
 
MQ-7 normal air output  150
     Isopropile alcohol 750
     Lighter Gas        900
     Benzine            800
     Breath1            170
     Breath2            160
MQ-135 normal air output 130
      Isopropile alcohol 700
      Lighter Gas        760
      Benzine            450
      Breath1            150
      Breath2            140

the results are:

MQ-2 shows good sensibility to Lighter Gas

MQ-3 detects well Isopropile alcohol and Benzine

MQ-7 detects well Isopropile alcohol, Lighter gas and Benzine

MQ-135 detects well Isopropile alcohol, Lighter gas

Microsoft and Arduino – New partnership

windowsarduino

http://blog.arduino.cc/2015/04/30/microsoft-and-arduino-new-partnership/

Arduino developers seems have lost their focus lately and make mistake after mistake!

Everybody knows that the success formula to Arduino was to keep it simple so the beginners to may use it without knowing in deep electronics and programming but simple reusing code made from Arduino team and community.

For many years AVR simple 8-bit processors serveed well Arduino, but later they were tempted to make the Mega (IMO not quite successful as expensive) then the misunderstanding named Yun which was sold for $60 while there are routers with same chip for $10. Then Intel bribed them to add totally different architecture just to ride the “Arduino” wave.

How much useful is all this diversification? Not much I would say if I count the projects which are using Arduino and simple 8-bit AVRs are still 99% of all projects. So who need all this new crap? It just confuses the beginners.

Then came the bad news for the Arduino trademark dispute which sent bad message to the community taking the dirty laundry to the pubic in the court.

Now we read for the latest news – Microsoft the symbol for closed source company bribed Arduino team for a partnership “Windows10 is the first Arduino certified OS”

WTF? How much did you guys got for this ‘certification’ and what message do you send to Open Source community with this?

Are you so desperate for $$$ after the split with Gianluca who manufacture and sells the ‘original’ Arduinos without paying licensee to the development team.

For many years Arduino was example for the most successful Open Source project ever. With this announcement we see that now everything changes and it’s simple matter of money.

Apple ][ emulator with Arduino-Uno, this is insane!

arduino

Damian Peckett did something which I would initially think it’s impossible to implement. He made Apple ][ emulator with Arduino-UNO.

How is this possible? Apple ][ had 48 K of RAM but Arduino has only 2K of SRAM? Well he emulates just the video RAM and for BASIC there is just 1K memory, so not the complete memory map is available, but still good proof of concept.

He is generating VGA video signal and use PS2 keyboard. As you can see on this video the emulator is working:

http://static.dpeckett.com/apple/stream.mp4

Now if I had some more time to port the code to processor with 48K or more RAM … would have complete Apple ][ on chip and play Karateka :)

Programming ESP8266-EVB with Arduino IDE

arduino

 

We made Arduino style library to easy the stand alone ESP8266 programming, but we were not using any IDE but mostly command line compile and programming. Two of our developers decided to use Eclipse and set it up for ESP8266 tools.

Yesterday we spotted on ESP8266_wiki GitHub account that someone already add support for ESP8266 in the latest Arduino 1.6.1 IDE release, how cool is this?

I decide to try it today. I downloaded the pre-build binaries arduino-1.6.1-linux64.tar.xz and decompress it in /home folder then ran terminal and “sudo ./arduino” in the Arduino-1.6.1 folder, the Arduino IDE was launched.

Then I connected USB-SERIAL-Cable-F to ESP8266-EVB Open Source Hardware board UEXT connector connecting blue wire to PIN2, the green wire to PIN.3 and red wire to PIN.4 on the UEXT connector as on this picture:

esp8266

Then in Arduino IDE I Selected Tools->Board-> Generic ESP8266 board

Then connected USB-SERIAL-CABLE-F to USB and selected Tools-> Port -> /dev/ttyUSB0

Then selected Tools-> Programmer->esptool

From examples loaded Blink LED then changed the port 13 to port 5 where the relay is connected.

I pressed the ESP8266-EVB button and connect 5V power supply to board to make it enter in bootloader mode, then click on Upload button.

The sketch was compiled and uploaded successfully then the relay start to switch on and off like expected.

Well done! I didn’t check all the libraries, but I see inside demos for web servers etc.

 

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