Writing applications for OLinuXino with GTK

GPIO

Many times I hear from customers – Linux has no good UI, it’s made for servers but we want to make apps with windows drop boxes, check boxes etc.

Recently we found Simon Long’s C GUI Programming book and made two “windows” examples for OLinuXino.

We recommend you first to download the book and read it then to look at the code we made and uploaded to GitHub.

In the README.TXT you will find step by step instructions how to install and configure GTK for OLinuXino.

Then you can try the code and modify for your need.

GPIO example allow you to read or write GPIO state to any of the GPIO connectors of OLinuXino.

I2C example will allow you to interface to any of our UEXT boards with I2C interface. The example we test with MOD-IO.

I2C

eduArdu OSHW educational board new demo and tutorial updated on GitHub

eduArdu-3

The eduArdu-BotKit demo is uploaded on GitHub. This code control the robot with sound.

New LED_Matrix_Light library is uploaded. It contains only Clear, SetPixel, GetPixel, ClearPixel, Line, DrawRectangle, UpdateMatrix functions and do not take lot of memory like the LED_Matrix library which contains text scrolling and fonts.

Two more demo for capacitive buttons are add. One make sound depend on capacitance, the other prints the value of the capacity measured.

Programming eduArdu with Arduino explains how to install Arduino and some basics of programming for beginners, like what are arrays, variables, etc. It may be used as practice of what is learned in C/C++ class in school.

OLinuXino Open Source Hardware Single Board Linux Computers are now officially OSHWA certified

Ax0-OLinuXino-LIME-1

OLinuXino Open Source Hardware Linux Computers now are officially OSHWA certified. The first: A13-OLinuXino, A10-OLinuXino-LIME, A20-OLinuXino-LIME, A20-OLinuXino-LIME2, A20-OLinuXino-MICRO has their assigned OSHWA certification numbers, the others are to follow as the process takes time.

Screenshot from 2019-07-08 14-30-06

Searching the OSHWA directory only Beagle Bone and OLinuXino are officially certified.

ESP32-POE-ISO passed RED,EMC, Helth and Safety tests necessary for issue of CE marking

ESP32-POE-ISO-2

We are proud to announce that ESP32-PoE-ISO board has passed successfully all necessary tests to bear CE marking:

  • EN 62311:2008 RED Health
  • EN 62479:2010 RED Health
  • EN 301 489-1 V2.2.1 (2019-03) RED EMC
  • EN 301 489-17 V3.2.0 (2017-03) RED EMC
  • ETSI EN 300 328 V2.1.1 (2016-11) WIFI-2.4GHz band radio test
  • EN 300 328 V2.1.1 (2016-11) BLE radio test
  • IEC 62368-1:2014 Safety

ESP32-EVB, ESP32-GATEWAY, ESP32-DevKit-Lipo, ESP32-POE are also going to be tested.

 

If you need more memory and micro SD card for your Arduino project -OLIMEXINO-2560 is with 256K Flash and SD card on board

OLIMEXINO-2560

OLIMEXINO-2560 is Arduino Mega2560 like board which keeps ports conversion but adds UEXT connector to connect our wide range of modules and sensors, works on 5V and 3.3V, and has on board micro SD card for file storage and logging.

Power supply uses DCDC convertor with input range 6-15VDC when OLIMEXINO-2560 works on 5V and 5-15VDC when OLIMEXINO-2560 works on 3.3V.

TuxCon 2019 soldering workshop kits are now on our web for sale

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The soldering workshop this year was for Open Source Hardware Universal Remote Control board using SMT components.

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All files for this kit are at GitHub including hardware, software sources and Assembly instructions. For these who didn’t manage to participate, now the kit is on our web for sale: URC

This year we had massive participation of kids from 4 to 12 years old.

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As the SMT components are bit odd to solder we prepared for them FOSDEM-85 kits with PTH components.

We were a bit concerned if they will not get burned by the soldering irons, but they surprised us as they were so precise and careful that all boards they soldered worked 100% from the very first time.

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Just for comparison when we do soldering workshops with adults from 20 up to 70 years old about 10% of the soldered boards do not start due to problems with misplaced components or bad soldering and we have to help them to fix. So it appears kids do solder better than adults 🙂

The Minibot kits from TuxCon 2018 soldering workshop are also on the web now.

It was wonderful weekend with lot of fun.

How secure are Allwinner SOC we use in our OLinuXino boards?

spyware

From time to time customers ask us:

You are using Chinese SOCs. I’ve heard that Chinese government forces all Chinese vendors to place back-doors in their SOCs which to spy on you. Can you guarantee that your Linux boards have no back doors to spy on us”

I already posted about Linux-Sunxi community, which develops the Allwinner SOC mainline Linux support. What I forgot to mention is that most of the SOC features and tuning they do is done almost without any official help or documentation from Allwinner and based mostly on tips from Allwinner employees and reverse engineering.

I do remember A20 CAN module was not mention at all as existent in Allwinner datasheets at the beginning and Linux-Sunxi developers found it while hacking the chip.

So I will have to disappoint people, who believe in such myths that no, A20 chips are for quite some time now and there is nothing hidden inside, even the Boot ROM which resides in the SOC internal ROM code and is executed first is disassembled and known code.

This for sure do not give any warranty that these SOCs are bug free and that someone latter may not find and exploit some bugs (I already wrote about the level of the SOC software developers in my previous post) and to create back door to install malware or spyware, but this is not done intentional and IMO above the capacity of the software developers working in the SOC vendors.

I still do remember Allwinner released few years ago SDK where they were forgotten to remove the debug flags and if you send message “rootmydevice” to /proc/sunxi_debug/sunxi_debug, you get root privileges, but was this intentional and forced by Chinese government? I doubt so.

We build our Linux Images from Armbian project sources using their repositories and our images has MD5, so if you load our Linux Images and use in our boards we are sure there are no back doors. I know the guys who are behind Armbian project and I can guarantee they do not work for the Chinese government.

Now you can say if you found undocumented CAN inside the SOC, there may be other undocumented modules as well which to spy on us. Yes, this is possible, but even if there are such hidden resources the software we run on the SOC does not take advantage of them and activate them, you can always monitor your USB/LAN etc traffic packets and see what information go outside the chip and so far for the last 6 years A20 is existent no one ever has detected such suspicious traffic.

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